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Archive for the ‘Six Flags’ Category

Sometimes when dealing with something as ugly as mitochondrial disease, it can be difficult to keep the focus on the good and the cure, rather than the sick and the disease. For this reason, I feel incredibly lucky and blessed to have such an amazing support network of friends and family. Even through the bad, they are able to keep a smile on my face and laughter in my belly. They are able to remind me not to focus on the disease, but rather they push me to fight for the cure, to become part of the cure.

This week is Mitochondrial Disease Awareness Week. But rather than tell you more about the disease – I think I’ve do a pretty good job for the mito-illiterate – I want to share with you all the good and amazing things I am blessed to have in my life. Because living with mito is not just about living with the disease, it’s about living.

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The last few days since my last post have been action-packed! Today, Keith and I went into Boston for my gastric emptying study, which is a precursor to the Antro-duodenal Motility test I’ll be having at the end of October. We confirmed what we already knew from endoscopy: my gastric emptying sucks. I arrived at 11am for the study, having fasted for about 10 hours. I was exhausted and just wanted to sleep – but more on the reason why below. I was sat down with 2 eggs scrambled with some yummy radioactivity goodness, a glass of water, and some toast. I warned the administrator I wasn’t very good with solid foods and then began choking them down. I asked if I could take some zofran after nearly losing the eggs on the floor, but was told “no.” I finished the eggs – barely – with 2 sips of water and no toast. I think the test ruined scrambled eggs for me permanently because I will forever associate them with a metallic taste.

I was then told that for the first hour I had to remain still on my back while a scanner took pictures every minute. If my stomach had cleared 50% of the food after 60 minutes, I could leave. I was told that 60 minutes is the average for a “normal” person. We laughed. He continued to say that after that I could sit up but we’d have to take more pictures every 30 minutes until I reached 50%. We were there 3 hours – usually, the test ends by 2 – and I still hadn’t reached 50%. Because the reading was exactly the same for the last 90 minutes, he said I could go as he didn’t see much happening soon after I kept steady at 44% emptied. I immediately took a zofran and drank some water as I couldn’t have anything for the last 3 hours. And that’s how I finished the 2nd of my 5 medical appointments this month.

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