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Archive for the ‘Hospital life’ Category

One year ago, a very special little girl came into our lives. Eithene (pronounced Eth – eh – nee) Rose was a 4-year-old beautiful ball of spunk who, like me, lived with a combination of Mitochondrial Disease (an neurometabolic disorder) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (a connective tissue defect). She was also born with numerous birth defects which are together known as VACTERL Association.

Over the last year, Keith and I have visited with Eithene and her family (mom Jessica, dad Sean, brother Gabriel, and Aunt Jill) whenever we were in Boston. We have grown to love them. We couldn’t leave a single store without Keith seeing something that reminded him of Eithene or one of the other mito kids we regularly visit. Eithene’s story, however, is somewhat unique. Over the time that we’ve known the family, Eithene has only left the hospital for about five days last July. Other than that, she’s mostly been in a room on the ICP (Intermediate Care Program, a step-down of the ICU) at Children’s Hospital Boston. We’ve visited through numerous infections and medical crises and seen the strength she exhibits on a daily basis. Her mother’s love and faith have been unwavering and inspiring. Not only that, but mom Jessica has helped me through a large number of my own medical crises.

Saying "hi" to True

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I’ve been home for nearly two weeks now. Recovery has been slow and has sapped me of most of my excess energy so many apologies. Because there’s so much to cover – and I’m having difficulties organizing my thoughts – we’re going to go about this bullet-style.

  • I’m home. I was discharged with a four-week course of IV Vancomycin (a very powerful antibiotic) at a very high dose. Because we never got those sensitivities back (i.e. what bug we’re fighting and what antibiotic is best to fight it) and my reaction to the infection scared them (though I assure you, it did not scare nor surprise me or Keith), the doctors are playing it safe. I guess that’s what they do best. I was also on Cipro (another antibiotic), but I have finished that course.

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Considering I am currently back at MGH for a central line infection (which is being treated as sepsis due to my plummeting blood pressures and skyrocketing temperatures and heart rate; this could, however, be due to my really screwy autonomic nervous system), I thought I’d address the issues we’re currently encountering with my current former central line (a PICC in my left arm) and the debate over what kind of line is most appropriate for the long term use we’re envisioning.

How did we get here from there?
My GI tract (from stomach to colon) is essentially paralyzed. After numerous tests and a 25-day hospital stay when it officially shut down, a GJ-tube was placed. Five days later, I was readmitted partially because the GJ-tube was not providing enough of the necessary nutrients. The solution was to place a central line (a peripherally inserted central catheter or “PICC”) so that I could receive calories and vital nutrients intravenously. At this point, the PICC and TPN were planned to be short-term aids until we could build up the feeds to my jejunum (the middle part of my small intestine). A couple months later, my GI doctor said it looks like TPN is the most viable long-term option for me.

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